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Medical Applications

Imitations

Posted by Stephen Playford on

Beware Synthetics & Imitations Medical Sheepskins and Bed Linen It is common practice in international medical literature to use the term 'sheepskin' to describe a whole range of products that often bear no resemblance to real sheepskins other than a fur-like pile and/or appearance. The misleading and incorrect use of the term 'sheepskin' and the growing, widespread usage of imitation products claiming to share the same properties as genuine medical sheepskin, has many practitioners confused about the properties and benefits of the authentic article. Consequently, a large number of sick and immobilized individuals are sitting or lying on pieces of...

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Infection Control

Posted by Stephen Playford on

Infection Control Medical Sheepskins and Bed Linen Medical sheepskins are used in the same way as bed linen, lie in direct contact with the skin. Consequently the micro-organisms found on them are the same as those on bed linen, essentially the normal skin flora. Where fecal soiling occurs, intestinal flora will also be present. These organisms do not present a cross-infection problem unless the user or handler has open skin lesions in direct contact with the sheepskin. If a patient has a diagnosed contagious disease, the medical sheepskin may become contaminated with pathogenic organisms, in which case it should be...

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Laundering

Posted by Stephen Playford on

Skinsan spec sheets and Laundering instructions (Updated Oct 27, 2015) The Procedure Laundering has often been a problem for medical sheepskins. This was partly related to poor tanning, but also due to hospitals directing skins to inappropriate washing regimes. Until recently, all medical sheepskins were to be laundered at not more than 60'C for a period of eight minutes. This was the maximum safe temperature for repeated washing of the leather. At this temperature and time there was minimal thermal disinfection, so a bacteriostat was required for disinfection. The major problems occurred when skins from infectious wards were included in the...

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Nursing Home

Posted by Stephen Playford on

From the Nursing Home The new Australian Medical Sheepskins provide enhanced levels of comfort, pressure relief and elimination of moisture for residents with reduced mobility and are a remarkable improvement over sheepskins previously used. The use of Australian Medical Sheepskins has shown that residents are easier to move with less risk to frail skin. There has also been a significant reduction in the incidence of skin tears and pressure areas. The color coding of blue and green for correct laundering and identification for increased urine resistance has been particularly helpful in identifying the specific purpose of these sheepskins. The sheepskins...

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Nursing Perspective

Posted by Stephen Playford on

Color Coding Stops Confusion From a personal perspective, both as a care giver and a patient, true sheepskins have proven invaluable. Confusion exists between genuine and imitation products. Imitation products are often misleadingly called sheepskins. As a result, definite identification is imperative. Prevention of bed sores is essential for the well being and comfort of the ill or the incapacitated. Various methods of assessment can be applied to ascertain the risk of pressure sore development, eg. Norton Scale, Waterlow Scale and/or visual assessment. These take into consideration age, continence, skin type, hydration, mobility and associated medical conditions. The placement of...

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